Welcome!

Bick Group

David Linthicum

Subscribe to David Linthicum: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get David Linthicum via: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Top Stories by David Linthicum

To mark a new standard in the SOA space, I create a Google Alert and sift through the pile of links returned to get the scope of its maturation. I'm currently tracking over 60 standards, starting with SOAP and XML (XML happened way before Google was cool). Lately I've noticed a drop in the number of blogs, links, and articles talking about particular SOA standards. Where I once got dozens of links a week on some standards, I now get only one or two or none. So, I'm thinking that standards, although around, aren't as cool as they once were, and maybe people are a bit confused by the alphabet soup out there. Standards have changed. At first they were good thoughts about a single way to do something, so everyone could mix and match solution patterns. They are now more marketing hype than anything else. In essence, if you're building a SOA product, make sure to start wit... (more)

SOA - Loosely Coupled...What?

With the advent of Web services and SOA, we've been seeking to create architectures and systems that are more loosely coupled. Loosely coupled systems provide many advantages including support for late or dynamically binding to other components while running, and can mediate the difference in the component's structure, security model, protocols, and semantics, thus abstracting volatility. This is in contrast to compile-time or runtime binding, which requires that you bind the components at compile time or runtime (synchronous calls), respectively, and also requires that changes ... (more)

SOA Vendors Focus Too Much on Integration . . .

We've all experienced the hype: "We're a SOA tool, and we're here to help!" However, most SOA vendors out there don't understand the value of SOA, or even how to approach SOA. They focus on the tactical and not the strategic. Why? A tactical approach is easier for them to sell, and easier for them to understand. However, this approach means they are selling their customers short. Take integration, for example. We've understood how to do integration since the early days of EAI, and, indeed, it's clearly a component of SOA. However, integration, on its own, is not architecture. Thu... (more)

Defining the Cloud Computing Framework

As cloud computing emerges there is a lot of discussion about how to define cloud computing as a computing model. Maturity models have been published and debated, and providers clearly have a model for their own products. In attempting to define this better to my clients, I came up with a "stack" of sorts, which I think makes logical sense, considering each component of cloud computing and how they interact. While clearly this could be much more complex, I don't think it needs to be. In essence, this is a model as to how one defines and refines the concept of cloud computing (see ... (more)

Leveraging Web Services for Application Integration

Web services holds the promise of moving beyond the simple exchange of information - the dominating mechanism for application integration today - to the concept of accessing application services that are encapsulated within old and new applications. This means organizations can not only move information from application to application, but they also can create composite applications, leveraging any number of back-end application services found in any number of applications, local or remote. Key to this concept is figuring out how Web services fit into the existing application int... (more)