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David Linthicum

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Top Stories by David Linthicum

While the notion of SOA continues to emerge, those who are implementing SOAs today are faced with a variety of challenges, including the complexities of SOA, and the work involved with understanding their existing problem domain and requirements. Those who want to get SOA right the first time quickly understand the benefits of a sound architecture and a good set of SOA design approaches. However, the understanding of how you approach your SOA, and best practices around building a SOA, are clearly lacking. Those who are looking to gain the benefits of SOA are perplexed by the wide reach of the technology, its links with traditional enterprise architecture, and how the game has changed since the structured and object-oriented analysis and design days. Truth be told, SOA is not something you buy, it's something you do. Thus, while the focus has been on the technology i... (more)

Service Archaeologist

Want to leverage your enterprise's Web services? Chances are you'll be enabling or exposing existing application services and not building new. This should come as no surprise to anyone. However, while we've been focusing on the development of new services, how to do it, and what tools to use, most of the work that I see coming is learning how to translate and expose legacy services. So, my prediction is that one of the best paid jobs in 2005 will be engineers specializing in Web services enablement of legacy systems. I'll call them service archaeologists. Indeed, most corporate... (more)

What Level Is Your SOA?

As I work with corporate America, as well as the government, I'm finding that services-oriented architectures (SOAs) are like snowflakes - no two are alike. I'm also finding that everyone has their own definition of SOA, and I've seen everything from messaging systems to portals called an SOA. So, who's right? I'm not sure I'm ready to declare somebody's architecture as non-SOA just yet;, however, there are some patterns that are emerging in terms of types of SOAs. I like to refer to these patterns as levels, since they have a tendency to move from the very primitive, or level 0, ... (more)

Brokering Web Services... The Next Big Thing?

Web services were created around the notion that it's easier to discover and leverage somebody else's service rather than write your own from scratch. Also, it is much easier to create applications made up of many services, thereby allowing change to occur at a pace faster than anything we've seen in the industry thus far. The idea of Web services was to create a standard interface, programming model, description language, and a directory that would allow this to happen in and among very different systems. Indeed, today you can leverage services across the Internet that are func... (more)

Joining Enterprises with "Web 2.0"

We are moving toward a day when most of our enterprise applications may be delivered as services, and thus provide a more economical way to approach information technology management with businesses going forward. This is also the great equalizer since businesses, large and small, will have access to the same number and quality of services, much like they do with Web sites today. Shared services will create many opportunities, including better agility and the ability to operate a business with fewer IT resources. In essence, we're moving to "Web 2.0"—where service delivery ... (more)